My E-Business Strategy students are looking for clients for an upcoming project. Simply put: we want to build your small business or non-profit a cutting edge website. We will be using a new tool this semester that specializes in using HTML 5 templates that look good on all devices: mobile phones, iPads, computers, etc. Here are examples of some of the templates you could choose from for your site.

There is no charge to you for us to build your site and you need not commit to using the website if you do not like it. If you do like the site and want to use it, we will work with you to transition support to our partner company, who will charge a small hosting fee (around $15/month). If you think you might be interested in working with us, please contact me using one of the links below.

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I am happy to share that we have completed the work on the biola.digital conference mobile app! This app has all the conference details, including session details, schedule, speaker bios, and logistical information. If you are coming to the conference, or if you are just trying to figure out if you want to come, go ahead and download the app. Here’s how you do it:

1) Download the “Grupio” app from your app store. If you are reading this on your mobile device, then just click the appropriate link below. If you prefer, there is also a mobile website version here.

     

2) Open the “Grupio”app on your mobile device and search for “biola.digital”. Your device will download all the conference details.

That’s it, the conference information is now available on your device. I hope you enjoy using the app!

Almost seven years ago, I wrote a blog post on The Transparent Society, David Brin’s insightful text on the delicate balance between privacy and security. The book, published in 1998, foretold the day whe be in a surveillance society. While the specifics of technology were not known at the time he wrote the book, he foretold a day when cameras were everywhere and your daily movements could be tracked. As the quick apprehension of the Boston Marathon bombers has shown, technology, specifically cameras, are now playing a key role in criminal investigations and tracking the movements of specific individuals. We are in the Transparent Society.

So now we all congratulate the law enforcement involved and agree that all this surveillance is a good thing, right?  While I certainly applaud the quick apprehension of the suspects (and mourn the loss of life), I think we also need to consider the society we are becoming. Is it really worth giving up some of our freedom, our privacy, to be more secure?

From security cameras to mobile phone cameras to surveillance drones, we are being watched everywhere we go. Add to this the facial recognition technologies, and we can now be “watched” via software. Just the way we use drones right now has raised many ethical questions.

For many, the standard response to this is, “I have nothing to hide, so it doesn’t really affect me.” This is understandable, but it is short-sighted. The ability for a government to project power so easily, both with surveillance cameras and drones as well as with armed drones, should make us all pause and reflect. Shouldn’t it?

Taking it further, as technology progresses, we will begin seeing the private use of drones. Drones will become smaller and less expensive (as all technology does) – soon we all may have our own drones for our own uses: checking on the kids while they are at camp, watching the house on vacation, remotely attending a LIttle League game, or maybe tracking the movements of people we do not like. Do you see the possible problems here?

So what can be done to address these issues? Let’s start by having some conversations about it. This needs to be front and center for policymakers. No matter what we do, technology will march on – let’s just be sure that we are prepared for it when it gets here.

What are your thoughts? Share with me in the comments.